The Royal Clarence Hotel

Kompas Exeter Instagram blog (6 November 2016)

Finally got chance to clap eyes on the Royal Clarence after its demolition during the week. Words don’t really do justice to the incredible sadness reverberating around Exeter since the loss of this iconic part of the Cathedral green – but if nothing else, this tragic blaze has encouraged both students and local residents to learn more about this historic building, and how Exeter has changed over the years. We’ll be honest: we didn’t know this was England’s oldest hotel until the fire began making headlines – but a bit of digging later, it turns out there’s plenty to learn about the Clarence! For example, did you know that Admiral Lord Nelson dined here in 1801? Or that Queen Victoria’s father was embalmed at the Clarence after dying suddenly in Sidmouth in 1820? Or that Thomas Hardy stayed here in 1915 while visiting a friend in Torquay? It’s sad that we never thought to find any of this out while the building was still standing… but it’s given us a definite push to keep digging out Exeter’s historic and architectural treasures, and to appreciate them while they’re around. Know a spot we should cover? Let us know 🙂 #RoyalClarence #Exeter #ExeterFire #RoyalClarenceHotel #AbodeExeter #Fire #HotelFire #ExeterCathedral #IgersExeter #OldestHotel #Historic #HistoricHotel #HistoricBuilding #Devon #VisitExeter #HistoricSite #ExeterLife #ExeterMemories

A post shared by KOMPAS Exeter (@kompasexeter) on

Finally got chance to clap eyes on the Royal Clarence after its demolition during the week. Words don’t really do justice to the incredible sadness reverberating around Exeter since the loss of this iconic part of the Cathedral green – but if nothing else, this tragic blaze has encouraged both students and local residents to learn more about this historic building, and how Exeter has changed over the years. We’ll be honest: we didn’t know this was England’s oldest hotel until the fire began making headlines – but a bit of digging later, it turns out there’s plenty to learn about the Clarence! For example, did you know that Admiral Lord Nelson dined here in 1801? Or that Queen Victoria’s father was embalmed at the Clarence after dying suddenly in Sidmouth in 1820? Or that Thomas Hardy stayed here in 1915 while visiting a friend in Torquay? It’s sad that we never thought to find any of this out while the building was still standing… but it’s given us a definite push to keep digging out Exeter’s historic and architectural treasures, and to appreciate them while they’re around. Know a spot we should cover? Let us know 🙂

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