Anne Frank Zentrum

Hidden Berlin Instagram feed and Facebook feed (11 January 2015)

Anne Frank: it’s a name connected with bravery, creativity, tragedy – and actually, not often linked to Berlin. But thanks to a partnership with the Anne Frank house in Amsterdam, there’s a brilliant opportunity for Berliners and visitors alike to learn more about the young girl behind the story. Through photos, quotes, diary extracts and artefacts, the exhibition “Anne Frank: here and now” follows the life of the teenage diarist: from her early years in Frankfurt; to life in Amsterdam as the Nazis took control in Germany; and eventually refuge in a home concealed by that now-famous bookcase. But this isn’t just a story of 1940s Europe: it’s a grasp back through the decades to see how Anne’s experiences relate to youngsters in Berlin today. What’s it like to be a Jewish teenager in Berlin? Or Muslim? What do Berlin’s youngsters think of war, and what are their dreams for the future? Explore all this and more through a multimedia exhibition that leaves you in awe – both of the teenage girl who inspired it all, and the youths who could well be called her legacy. #AnneFrank #AnneFrankZentrum #RosenthalerStrasse #AnneFrankMuseum #BerlinMitte #Mitte #History #WWII #HiddenBerlin #BerlinMuseum #Berlinstagram #Jewish #Berlin #StreetArt #StreetArtBerlin #BerlinStreetArt #Portrait

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Text: Anne Frank: it’s a name connected with bravery, creativity, tragedy – and actually, not often linked to Berlin. But thanks to a partnership with the Anne Frank house in Amsterdam, there’s a brilliant opportunity for Berliners and visitors alike to learn more about the young girl behind the story. Through photos, quotes, diary extracts and artefacts, the exhibition “Anne Frank: here and now” follows the life of the teenage diarist: from her early years in Frankfurt; to life in Amsterdam as the Nazis took control in Germany; and eventually refuge in a home concealed by that now-famous bookcase. But this isn’t just a story of 1940s Europe: it’s a grasp back through the decades to see how Anne’s experiences relate to youngsters in Berlin today. What’s it like to be a Jewish teenager in Berlin? Or Muslim? What do Berlin’s youngsters think of war, and what are their dreams for the future? Explore all this and more through a multimedia exhibition that leaves you in awe – both of the teenage girl who inspired it all, and the youths who could well be called her legacy.

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